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Quick Start#

This guide is to help administrators configure RSPM for your organizations specific use cases.

Prerequisites#

If you haven't already, follow the instructions for installing and licensing RSPM.

Your user must be a member of the rstudio-pm group:

Terminal

sudo usermod -aG rstudio-pm <USER>

Replace <USER> with the desired RSPM admin user. After running this command, restart your shell.

Finally, add the rspm binary in one of two ways:

  • Set up an alias: alias rspm='/opt/rstudio-pm/bin/rspm'
  • Add the rspm CLI binary to your system path: export PATH=/opt/rstudio-pm/bin:$PATH

Overview#

The right sidebar contains quick start guides. Follow the ones that are best suited for your use case(s).

For example, most basic RSPM installations will:

You can always add additional package support in the future.

Once you have configured the server, share the URL to the web interface with your users. Users can set up R, Python, or RStudio to use RSPM by following the instructions included in each repository's Setup page.

Tip

RStudio Workbench, formerly RStudio Server Pro, can be configured to use RSPM without requiring user setup. For more information, see the configuration instructions.

Serving CRAN Packages#

A common use case for RSPM is making CRAN packages available in environments with restricted internet access.

To make the CRAN packages available:

  • Ensure that RSPM has the appropriate metadata using the sync command. RSPM pulls CRAN packages and metadata from the RStudio Package Service.
  • Create a repository and subscribe it to the built-in source named cran.

Terminal

<< # Create a repository:
$ rspm create repo --name=prod-cran --description='Access CRAN packages'

<< # Subscribe the repository to the cran source:
$ rspm subscribe --repo=prod-cran --source=cran

<< # Initiate a sync:
$ rspm sync --type=cran

After running the sync command, future updates will automatically occur on a daily schedule by default. You do not need to manually run the sync command again after this. To learn more about how to customize the sync schedule, see the Synchronizing with the RStudio Package Service section.

After completing these steps, the prod-cran repository is available in the web interface.

Serving CRAN Snapshots#

If you prefer to make CRAN packages available for only specific dates, you can use a cran-snapshot source. For example:

Terminal

<< # Initiate a sync:
$ rspm sync --type=cran

<< # List available snapshot dates (increase the count to see more options)
$ rspm list cran snapshots --count=25

<< # Create source from desired date:
$ rspm create source --name=cran-by-date --type=cran-snapshot --snapshot=2020-07-09

<< # Create a repository:
$ rspm create repo --name=prod-cran --description='Access CRAN packages by date'

<< # Subscribe a repository to the cran-snapshot source:
$ rspm subscribe --repo=prod-cran --source=cran-by-date

<< # To update in the future:
$ rspm update --source=cran-by-date --snapshot=2020-10-06 --commit

Serving Curated CRAN Subsets#

If you prefer to make only a subset of CRAN packages available, you can use a curated-cran source. Curated CRAN sources automatically identify the dependencies required for a set of top-level R packages. You can also specify which CRAN date to use.

Terminal

<< # Ensure you have CRAN metadata:
$ rspm sync --type=cran

<< # Create the curated-cran source from a specific starting date:
$ rspm create source --name=subset --type=curated-cran --snapshot=2020-07-06

<< # Specify the top-level packages you want to add:
$ rspm add --packages=ggplot2,shiny --source=subset

The result will contain information on all the packages that will be added. The proposal can be saved to a CSV file using the csv-out flag. The required dependencies for the named packages are automatically discovered and included. Optionally use the --include-suggests flag to also discover and add suggested packages.

This action will add the following packages:

Name        Version  Path License                   Needs Compilation Dependency
BH          1.66.0-1      BSL-1.0                   no                true
crayon      1.3.4         MIT + file LICENSE        no                true
digest      0.6.15        GPL (>= 2)                yes               true
htmltools   0.3.6         GPL (>= 2)                no                true
httpuv      1.4.3         GPL (>= 2) | file LICENSE yes               true
ISLR        1.2           GPL-2                     no                false
jsonlite    1.5           MIT + file LICENSE        yes               true
later       0.7.3         GPL (>= 2)                yes               true
...         ...           ...                       ...               ...

To commit the changes, follow the instructions:

Terminal

<< # Commit the top-level packages you want to add:
$ rspm add --packages=ggplot2,shiny --source=subset --snapshot=2020-07-06 --commit

In order to ensure consistency, the entire source must be updated at once, not individual packages.

Terminal

<< # Update packages in a curated-cran source:
$ rspm update --source=subset --snapshot=2020-10-07

A preview of the changes is presented:

This action will add or archive the following packages:

Name      Version  Path              License                     Needs Compilation Dependency Action
backports 1.1.10                     GPL-2 | GPL-3               yes               true       add
callr     3.4.4                      MIT + file LICENSE          no                true       add
glue      1.4.2                      MIT + file LICENSE          yes               true       add
jsonlite  1.7.1                      MIT + file LICENSE          yes               true       add
Rcpp      1.0.5                      GPL (>= 2)                  yes               true       add
rlang     0.4.7                      GPL-3                       yes               true       add
tibble    3.0.3                      MIT + file LICENSE          yes               true       add
vctrs     0.3.4                      GPL-3                       yes               true       add
withr     2.3.0                      GPL (>= 2)                  no                true       add
backports 1.1.8                      GPL-2 | GPL-3               yes                          archive
callr     3.4.3                      MIT + file LICENSE          no                           archive
glue      1.4.1                      MIT + file LICENSE          yes                          archive
jsonlite  1.7.0                      MIT + file LICENSE          yes                          archive
...

To commit the changes:

Terminal

<< # Update packages in a curated-cran source:
$ rspm update --source=subset --snapshot=2020-10-07 --commit

Finally, be sure to subscribe a repository to the source to make the packages available to users:

Terminal

<< # Create a repository:
$ rspm create repo --name=prod-cran --description='Access curated CRAN packages by date'

<< # Subscribe a repository to the curated-cran source:
$ rspm subscribe --repo=prod-cran --source=subset

Tip

Curated CRAN repositories also support adding a large number of packages that are specified in a file. To do this, create a file containing one package name per line. For example, /tmp/packages.csv:

plumber
shiny
ISLR

Then use the add command, this time using the --file-in flag:

Terminal

$ rspm add --file-in='/tmp/packages.csv' --source=subset

Distributing Local Packages#

Many teams have a handful of internally built packages. If your internal packages are tracked in Git, then refer to the Serving Git Packages section.

If your internal packages are already built, they can be added as Local packages:

Note

If you are unfamiliar with building the bundled version of a package, then reach out to the R developer that maintains the package.

  • Copy the resulting tar files to the RSPM server:

Terminal

<< # Create a local source:
$ rspm create source --name=prod-internal-src

<< # Add each local package tar file to the source:
<< #  The tar file must be rwx by the user running the CLI and the account running
<< #  RSPM (rstudio-pm by default)
$ rspm add --source=prod-internal-src --path='/path/to/package_1.0.tar.gz'

<< # Create a repository:
$ rspm create repo --name=prod-internal --description='Stable releases of our internal packages'

<< # Subscribe the repository to the source:
$ rspm subscribe --repo=prod-internal --source=prod-internal-src

Bulk Installing Packages#

RSPM also supports installing multiple packages at the same time in a single snapshot. This can be accomplished with two different methods:

  1. Appending the paths together in a comma-seperated string with the --path flag
  2. Passing in a CSV file with the file-in flag

For the first method, appending all the paths together looks like the following:

Terminal

$ rspm add --source=prod-internal-src --path='/path/to/package_1.0.tar.gz, /path/to/package2_1.1.tar.gz'

The second method supports passing in a list of packages in a CSV file. The format for the CSV looks like:

/path/to/package_1.0.tar.gz
/path/to/package2_1.1.tar.gz

And the command to use the CSV file is:

Terminal

$ rspm add --source=prod-internal-src --file-in='/path/to/packages.csv'

Note

When using these methods, all packages will share the same --replace value if the flag is provided. Make sure it is okay for all of the packages to be overwritten before running these commands.

Multiple Package Versions#

RSPM automatically supports multiple versions of each package. When the R developers are ready for the next release of a package, simply run:

Terminal

rspm add --source=prod-internal-src --path='/path/to/package_2.0.tar.gz'

RSPM ensures that version 2.0 is the default for new installations.

Note

If you wish to use an older version, RSPM keeps version 1.0 in the repository's archive.

Most internal packages depend on packages from CRAN. In this case, the easiest option is to create a repository that subscribes to both a local source and CRAN.

Tip

Repositories can subscribe to multiple sources if you want users to be able to install internal packages and CRAN packages from a single place. See rspm subscribe --help.

Serving Git Packages#

The previous configuration uses a local source and requires manual steps to add and update packages. If your organization uses Git to store internal R packages, then you can automate this process using a Git source.

Git sources require a valid R installation. For more information, see Building Git Packages for R.

Terminal

<< # Create a Git source:
$ rspm create source --type=git --name=prod-internal-src

<< # Create a Git builder, configured to surface tagged commits:
$ rspm create git-builder --url=https://bitbucket.example.com/r-pkg.git --source=prod-internal-src --build-trigger=tags

<< # Check the status and learn more about the build:
$ rspm list git-builds --source=prod-internal-src --name=r-pkg

<< # Read the build logs using the ID from the previous
<< # command output or from the "Activity" log in the UI:
$ rspm logs --transaction-id=[ID]

<< # Create a repository and subscribe it to the source:
$ rspm create repo --name=prod-git --description='Stable releases of our internal packages'
$ rspm subscribe --source=prod-internal-src --repo=prod-git

Packages can be built using Git endpoints accessed via HTTP(s) or SSH URLs: https://github.com/user/repo.git vs. git@github.com:user/repo.git.

Note

For Git systems with non-standard ports, RSPM also supports an SSH schema that can be used to specify the port. In practice this looks like: ssh://git@github.com:22/rstudio/rstudio.git. See the SSH Protocol section of Git on the Server - The Protocols for more information.

If the Git URL uses SSH, then it requires an SSH key for authentication. In this case, import the key before using the create git-builder command.

SSH keys are not required to use a passphrase, but a secure key with passphrase is recommended.

Terminal

<< # Import the SSH key:
<< # passphrase file should just be text file with passphrase for key (avoid leaving in bash history):
$ rspm import ssh-key --name=read-r-pkg --path=/path/to/ssh/key --passphrase-path=/path/to/passphrase/file

<< # Optionally, remove the key from disk:
<< # rm /path/to/ssh/key

<< # Create the Git builder
$ rspm create git-builder --url=user@bitbucket.example.com/r-pkg.git --source=prod-internal-src --build-trigger=tags --ssh-key=read-r-pkg

For more details on Git credential security or using HTTPS credentials, see Access Restricted Git Endpoints Using Git Credentials.

For more information on serving Git packages, see Building Git Packages for R.

Serving Bioconductor Packages#

RSPM can serve Bioconductor packages from two types of repositories:

  1. Bioconductor repositories provide multiple versions of Bioconductor side by side and serve as a Bioconductor mirror. Packages are installed from these repositories using the BiocManager package. This is the most common way to make Bioconductor packages available.
  2. R repositories provide a single version of Bioconductor in a CRAN-like repository. Packages are installed from these repositories using install.packages. Unlike Bioconductor repositories, R repositories allow CRAN, Local, and Git packages to be served alongside Bioconductor packages in the same repository.

The appropriate repository type to use depends on how your organization uses Bioconductor.

Bioconductor Repositories#

To create a Bioconductor repository, run the following commands:

Note

All Bioconductor versions will be synced and automatically added to the repository.

Terminal

<< # Create a Bioconductor repository named 'bioconductor':
$ rspm create repo --type=bioconductor --name=bioconductor
<< Repository: bioconductor - Bioconductor

<< # Initiate a Bioconductor sync:
$ rspm sync --type=bioconductor
<< ...
<< Initiated Bioconductor synchronization for bioc-3.11-bioc. Depending on how much data has been previously synchronized, this could take a while. Actions will appear in the Package Manager UI as they are completed.
<< Initiated Bioconductor synchronization for bioc-3.11-data/annotation. Depending on how much data has been previously synchronized, this could take a while. Actions will appear in the Package Manager UI as they are completed.
<< ...
<< Bioconductor synchronization complete.

After running the sync command, future updates will automatically occur on a daily schedule by default. You do not need to manually run the sync command again after this. To learn more about how to customize the sync schedule, see the Synchronizing with the RStudio Package Service section.

We also recommend creating a repository that provides compatible CRAN snapshots for past Bioconductor releases. To provide CRAN snapshots, create a repository that subscribes only to CRAN:

Terminal

<< # Check if an existing repository already subscribes to CRAN only:
$ rspm list
<< ...
<< prod-cran - R
<<  - cran (CRAN)

<< # If not, run the following commands:

<< # Create a repository named 'prod-cran':
$ rspm create repo --name=prod-cran --description='Access CRAN packages'

<< # Subscribe the repository to the CRAN source:
$ rspm subscribe --repo=prod-cran --source=cran

<< # Initiate a CRAN sync:
$ rspm sync --type=cran

The Bioconductor repository should now be available in the web interface and ready to use. If a CRAN repository was created, the Setup page for the Bioconductor repository will provide instructions for configuring an appropriate CRAN snapshot in the Using a CRAN Snapshot section.

R Repositories#

Alternatively, you can serve a single version of Bioconductor in an R repository.

First, list the available Bioconductor versions and create a Bioconductor source for the desired version:

Terminal

<< # List available Bioconductor versions:
$ rspm list bioconductor versions
<< Available Bioconductor versions:
<< 3.12
<< 3.11
<< 3.10
<< ...

<< # Create a source for Bioconductor 3.11:
$ rspm create source --type=bioconductor --version=3.11
<< Source 'bioc-3.11':
<<  Type:  Bioconductor

Then, create an R repository, subscribe it to the source, and sync the source:

Terminal

<< # Create a repository for Bioconductor 3.11 named 'bioconductor-3.11':
$ rspm create repo --name=bioconductor-3.11 --description='Access Bioconductor 3.11 packages'

<< # Subscribe the repository to the Bioconductor source:
$ rspm subscribe --repo=bioconductor-3.11 --source=bioc-3.11

<< # Initiate a sync for the Bioconductor source:
$ rspm sync --type=bioconductor --source=bioc-3.11
<< Initiated Bioconductor synchronization for bioc-3.11-bioc. Depending on how much data has been previously synchronized, this could take a while. Actions will appear in the Package Manager UI as they are completed.
<< Initiated Bioconductor synchronization for bioc-3.11-data/annotation. Depending on how much data has been previously synchronized, this could take a while. Actions will appear in the Package Manager UI as they are completed.
<< ...
<< Bioconductor synchronization for bioc-3.11 complete.

For past Bioconductor releases, we also recommend serving CRAN packages from this repository that are compatible with the Bioconductor version. To add the appropriate CRAN packages:

  1. Find the last date that the Bioconductor release was current. This is usually the date of the next Bioconductor release, which can be found here.
  2. Find a CRAN snapshot that coincides with this date using the list cran snapshots command.
  3. Create a CRAN snapshot source and add it to the repository.

For example, to add CRAN packages for Bioconductor 3.11 (current until October 28, 2020):

Terminal

<< # Ensure CRAN metadata is available:
$ rspm sync --type=cran

<< # List available CRAN snapshots:
$ rspm list cran snapshots
<< ...
<< 2020-10-29
<< 2020-10-28
<< 2020-10-27

<< # Create a CRAN snapshot source for October 28, 2020:
$ rspm create source --type=cran-snapshot --snapshot=2020-10-28 --name=cran-2020-10-28

<< # Subscribe the CRAN snapshot source:
$ rspm subscribe --repo=bioconductor-3.11 --source=cran-2020-10-28
<< Repository: bioconductor-3.11
<< Sources:
<< --bioc-3.11 (Bioconductor)
<< --cran-2020-10-28 (CRAN Snapshot)

Serve Local Binary Packages#

You can add your own precompiled binary packages to local sources. After adding a source package, you can supplement the source with additional binary packages:

Terminal

# Build the source package, package_1.0.tar.gz
R CMD build /path/to/package

# Build the binary package, package_1.0-binary.tar.gz (Linux) or package_1.0.zip (Windows)
R CMD INSTALL --build package_1.0.tar.gz
  • Install the source and binary packages:

Terminal

<< # Create a local source:
$ rspm create source --name=prod-internal-src

<< # Add the local package tar file to the source:
$ rspm add --source=prod-internal-src --path='/path/to/package_1.0.tar.gz'

<< # List available binary distributions
$ rspm list distributions
<< Binary distributions: 
<<   bionic
<<   ...
<<   windows

<< # Add the precompiled binary packages to the source:
$ rspm add binary --source=prod-internal-src --distribution=bionic --path='/path/to/package-binary.tar.gz'
$ rspm add binary --source=prod-internal-src --distribution=windows --path='/path/to/package-binary.zip'

<< # Create a repository:
$ rspm create repo --name=prod-internal --description='Stable releases of our internal packages with binaries'

<< # Subscribe the repository to the source:
$ rspm subscribe --repo=prod-internal --source=prod-internal-src

Serve Git Binary Packages#

You can add your own precompiled binary packages to Git sources. After building a Git package, you can supplement the source with additional binary packages. See Serving Git Packages for an example.

Note

Git sources automatically assign unique versions to each source package when building packages based on commits to a branch. The automatic version includes a suffix that is based on the current timestamp, which makes it difficult to upload precompiled binary packages for the Git source. When you wish to upload binary packages for a Git source, we recommend configuring the Git builder to use tags. See Commits vs Tags for more details.

  • Create the Git package

    Terminal

    << # Create a Git source:
    $ rspm create source --type=git --name=prod-internal-src
    
    << # Create a Git builder, configured to surface tagged commits:
    $ rspm create git-builder --url=https://bitbucket.example.com/r-pkg.git --source=prod-internal-src --build-trigger=tags
    
    << # Create a repository and subscribe it to the source:
    $ rspm create repo --name=prod-git --description='Stable releases of our internal packages'
    $ rspm subscribe --source=prod-internal-src --repo=prod-git
    

  • Create precompiled binary packages for the R version and distributions you need. See Adding Local and Git Binaries for more information about R binary packages.

Terminal

# Build the source package, package_1.0.tar.gz
R CMD build /path/to/package

# Build the binary package, package_1.0-binary.tar.gz (Linux) or package_1.0.zip (Windows)
R CMD INSTALL --build package_1.0.tar.gz
  • Install the binary packages:

Terminal

<< # List available binary distributions
$ rspm list distributions
<< Binary distributions: 
<<   bionic
<<   ...
<<   windows

<< # Add the precompiled binary packages to the Git source:
$ rspm add binary --source=prod-internal-src --distribution=bionic --path='/path/to/package-binary.tar.gz'
$ rspm add binary --source=prod-internal-src --distribution=windows --path='/path/to/package-binary.zip'

Use the CLI Remotely to Add Binary Packages#

You can use the RSPM CLI remotely to add source and binary packages.

On the RSPM Server, enable the Authentication.APITokenAuth configuration setting.

On the RSPM server, use the CLI to generate a token with access to the correct sources:

Terminal

rspm create source --name=local-src
rspm create repo --name=local
rspm subscribe --repo=local --source=local-src
rspm create token --description="user A" --sources=local-src --expires=30d
<< Generated an access token. Be sure to record this token immediately since you will not be able to retrieve it later.
<< eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiIsInR5cCI6IkpXVCJ9.eyJhdWQiOiJwYWNrYWdlbWFuYWdlciIsImV4cCI6MTY1ODU4MjA3OCwianRpIjoiYmM5ZTg1NGYtNGNlNy00Zjc4LTlhMmMtZDliYzRlYTQ0NGVkIiwiaWF0IjoxNjU1OTkwMDc4LCJpc3MiOiJodHRwOi8vbG9jYWxob3N0OjQyNDIvIiwic2NvcGVzIjp7InNvdXJjZXMiOiIzYTI4NjFhYi0xNWYwLTRjM2MtODZlMy0xNjNkMTY0ZDE0ZDYifX0.BWJXLworo44Nvfrh5a2hm_NIqgUoXTLjQlxyy7uaSWk

On the remote machine, export the correct environment variables and download the CLI:

export PACKAGEMANAGER_TOKEN=eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiIsInR5cCI6IkpXVCJ9.eyJhdWQiOiJwYWNrYWdlbWFuYWdlciIsImV4cCI6MTY1ODU4MjA3OCwianRpIjoiYmM5ZTg1NGYtNGNlNy00Zjc4LTlhMmMtZDliYzRlYTQ0NGVkIiwiaWF0IjoxNjU1OTkwMDc4LCJpc3MiOiJodHRwOi8vbG9jYWxob3N0OjQyNDIvIiwic2NvcGVzIjp7InNvdXJjZXMiOiIzYTI4NjFhYi0xNWYwLTRjM2MtODZlMy0xNjNkMTY0ZDE0ZDYifX0.BWJXLworo44Nvfrh5a2hm_NIqgUoXTLjQlxyy7uaSWk
export PACKAGEMANAGER_ADDRESS=https://my-rspm-server.org:4443

<< # Download the CLI
curl -fOJH "Authorization: Bearer ${PACKAGEMANAGER_TOKEN}" "${PACKAGEMANAGER_ADDRESS}/__api__/download"
chmod +x rspm
export PACKAGEMANAGER_TOKEN=eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiIsInR5cCI6IkpXVCJ9.eyJhdWQiOiJwYWNrYWdlbWFuYWdlciIsImV4cCI6MTY1ODU4MjA3OCwianRpIjoiYmM5ZTg1NGYtNGNlNy00Zjc4LTlhMmMtZDliYzRlYTQ0NGVkIiwiaWF0IjoxNjU1OTkwMDc4LCJpc3MiOiJodHRwOi8vbG9jYWxob3N0OjQyNDIvIiwic2NvcGVzIjp7InNvdXJjZXMiOiIzYTI4NjFhYi0xNWYwLTRjM2MtODZlMy0xNjNkMTY0ZDE0ZDYifX0.BWJXLworo44Nvfrh5a2hm_NIqgUoXTLjQlxyy7uaSWk
export PACKAGEMANAGER_ADDRESS=https://my-rspm-server.org:4443

<< # Download the CLI
curl -fOJH "Authorization: Bearer ${PACKAGEMANAGER_TOKEN}" "${PACKAGEMANAGER_ADDRESS}/__api__/download?os=darwin"
chmod +x rspm
$Env:PACKAGEMANAGER_TOKEN = "eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiIsInR5cCI6IkpXVCJ9.eyJhdWQiOiJwYWNrYWdlbWFuYWdlciIsImV4cCI6MTY1ODU4MjA3OCwianRpIjoiYmM5ZTg1NGYtNGNlNy00Zjc4LTlhMmMtZDliYzRlYTQ0NGVkIiwiaWF0IjoxNjU1OTkwMDc4LCJpc3MiOiJodHRwOi8vbG9jYWxob3N0OjQyNDIvIiwic2NvcGVzIjp7InNvdXJjZXMiOiIzYTI4NjFhYi0xNWYwLTRjM2MtODZlMy0xNjNkMTY0ZDE0ZDYifX0.BWJXLworo44Nvfrh5a2hm_NIqgUoXTLjQlxyy7uaSWk"
$Env:PACKAGEMANAGER_ADDRESS = "https://my-rspm-server.org:4443"

# Download the CLI
$urlCLI = "$Env:PACKAGEMANAGER_ADDRESS/__api__/download?os=windows"
$outputCLI = "rspm.exe"
$wc = New-Object System.Net.WebClient
$wc.Headers['Authorization'] = "Bearer $Env:PACKAGEMANAGER_TOKEN"
$wc.DownloadFile($urlCLI, $outputCLI)

# Alternatively, on Windows 10 (v1803+), you can download the CLI with curl
curl -OutFile rspm.exe -Headers @{ Authorization = "Bearer $Env:PACKAGEMANAGER_TOKEN"} "$Env:PACKAGEMANAGER_ADDRESS/__api__/download?os=windows"

After the environment variables are set, the remote machine can use CLI commands that support remote use:

./rspm add --source=local-src --path=/packages/my-package.tar.gz
./rspm add binary --source=local-src --distribution=bionic --path=/binaries/my-package-bin.tar.gz
.\rspm.exe add --source=local-src --path=C:\packages\my-package.tar.gz
.\rspm.exe add binary --source=local-src --distribution=bionic --path C:\binaries\my-package-bin.tar.gz

Python and Mirroring PyPI#

Another common use case for RSPM is making PyPI (the Python Package Index) packages available in environments with restricted internet access.

To make the PyPI packages available:

  • Ensure that RSPM has the appropriate metadata using the sync command. RSPM pulls PyPI packages and metadata from the RStudio Package Service.
  • Create a repository and subscribe it to the built-in source named pypi.

Terminal

<< # Create a Python repository:
$ rspm create repo --name=pypi --type=python --description='Access PyPI packages'
<< Repository: pypi - Python

<< # Subscribe the repository to the PyPI source:
$ rspm subscribe --repo=pypi --source=pypi
<< Repository: pypi
<< Sources:
<< --pypi (Python)

<< # Initiate a PyPI sync:
$ rspm sync --type=pypi
<< Initiated PyPI synchronization for pypi. Depending on how much data has been previously synchronized, this could take a while. Actions will appear in the Package Manager UI as they are completed.

<< Snapshots for pypi: 0 / 34 [----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------]
<< Packages in pypi snapshot: 14127 / 231734 [======>-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------] 5m9

After running the sync command, future updates will automatically occur on a daily schedule by default. You do not need to manually run the sync command again after this. To learn more about how to customize the sync schedule, see the Synchronizing with the RStudio Package Service section.

Tip

Configure additional storage before enabling PyPI packages to handle the large metadata and package downloads.

For more information on RSPM's Python capabilities see the Python section of the documentation.